Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘gardening’


I just laughed at this. I ordered 2 bottles (1 liter each) of liquid hand wash and the seller requested that I post a picture of it online together with my photo. Free advert? I posted a photo of the two bottles on FB without my picture…haha!

Lately, I’ve been using online stores to buy what we need. Yesterday, my order for maintenance medicine arrived and the pharmacy asked me to comment a word or two on their site, the kind of service, how fast it is etc. I obliged. It’s their way of getting additional customers I guess.

Finally, I am almost done cleaning and weeding the garden. Josef and Jovy are on vacation leave for a week so Josef helped me to trim the grass this afternoon.  It’s hot again, there was no rain for the past two days. Summer is almost over but I didn’t get to appreciate it much because of the lockdown. Whereas before, during summer, I would buy fruits in season but I could not go out nowadays. They say there is no need for quarantine pass but the way I see it, we are still on the upward curve, nothing has changed.

Back in April 2015, I read a book  entitled All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, Goodreads Choice 2014 Winner.  I know I posted a review of it somewhere here.  I found another book of his called About Grace, my third book but it seems a little disappointing, the narrative is good but the story? It was beautifully crafted of course, the language is good but I got lost in the plot.  All the while I wondered if he is the same author of All the Light You Cannot See.  I also wonder if I could finish the book until the end. For me, it’s either you can totally relate or you get bored.  There are so many still on my TBR list. I got curious about the short summary of  The Given Day by Denise Lehan. It touched on the Spanish influenza pandemic which I think is more interesting considering what we have right now, another pandemic. Try to read his other book Mystic River which I think is his best.

What do you know, I’m done with 56 books so far this year.

 

Read Full Post »


Aren’t I lucky? I found a sequel to the book The Bark Cutters by Nicole Alexander called A Changing Land. It is as engrossing as the first book. How I wish I could find more of her books in the future.

You know one good thing that I appreciate being on quarantine for more than two months now? I am able to attend daily live streaming of masses online. We need to have a stronger  faith in these times of uncertainties. We never know when everything goes back to normal again. We ask for the grace of strength and fidelity to you Lord.  We ask for endurance in our daily battle with this pandemic.

I spent an hour in the garden very early this morning. The silence was unhampered by  cars and motor vehicles passing by.  How lovely it is to commune with nature when silence is all around. You are alone with your thoughts and sometimes, they are rich with things that you want to do, things you want to write about and things you dream of still becoming. Your thoughts wander beyond and you think of the times walking every morning  behind the house, a  vacant space  which is now full of houses.  Silence awakens that sleeping creative side of you. And you wish everything is back to normal. But what is normal nowadays?

There is one thing positive though that the days brought us, pollution has lessened. Family bonding is an everyday affair although sometimes you get to talk only via Viber or Messenger.  it is better than nothing though. Technology certainly has its advantage in these trying times.

Be safe, Be well. Be happy 🙂

 

Read Full Post »


Aside from the brutal and deadly effects of this pandemic, it also brought along something good for the people, the family in particular. Trite as it may sound, it forced us to just stay at home, be with the family members who we used  to see only a few hours before they go back to their jobs.  It brought us together.

  • Last night, I had a nice time having a video chat with Nate. Just hearing his excited voice shouting “I’m good Nonna” was enough for me. We haven’t seen each other for more than two months now. Every time I talk to Nissa,  either he is asleep, watching television or busy playing with his toys.
  • I am going back to reading but not as focused  as before, one book a week would be enough. I choose which book to read first, something fast-paced or inspirational.
  • I water my plants every day and when I see new growth, I am overjoyed. Yesterday, I planted more seeds of eggplants, beans and squash. I hope I could see them grow in a few days.
  • Josef and I picked calamansi too and gave some to our neighbor Jom. It costs a little expensive now in the market. Since Vitamin C tablets/capsules are out of stock, people have to make use of citrus fruits for their needs.
  • Our neighbor Jom gave us a sack of rice containing 25 kilos. This would tide us over for another  two months. A good soul donated more sacks for distribution to those in need.
  • The bayanihan spirit is working in our country despite those politicians who have  no concrete idea how to run it.  The Bayanihan (pronounced as buy-uh-nee-hun) is a Filipino custom derived from a Filipino word “bayan”, which means nation, town or community. The term bayanihan itself literally means “being in a bayan”, which refers to the spirit of communal unity, work and cooperation to achieve a particular goal. Those in the private sector are working hard to help with gargantuan donations. They are also setting up facilities for COVID-19 patients.  Even individuals who are well-off are sharing what they have. Here in our town, there are donors to the mayor’s office everyday and the mayor  gives those donations  to those areas where people can’t afford three meals a day.

These are just small things that makes the heart swell with gratefulness. Our faith will sustain us.  God is good and God is great.

Read Full Post »


I’ve tried planting some a few years ago, those crowns that we usually just throw away but I was not successful. Maybe they don’t want afternoon sun although what I know of them is that they are sun-loving plants.

Yesterday, I was surprised to see this. Finally, my lone pineapple plant is now bearing fruit. I planted it along with my Crossandra, getting the touch of the morning sun almost every day.

It is always lovely to see something that you have diligently watered and it gives you that nice feeling of seeing it bear fruit. Do you know that it usually takes two years for a cutting to mature and bear a flower? Then it would take six months for the fruit to be ready for harvest. I am waiting for it to produce a sucker that I can transfer later.

I am really excited. Counting the days 🙂

Read Full Post »


I gardened for a while this morning replanting my rain lilies, some succulents and trimmed the Fukien tea plants. It is a lovely weather to garden now. The sun is shining and yet there is a cold morning breeze blowing. Perfect 🙂

Two weeks ago, we had a left-over piece of Chayote inside the ref. It is a tropical fruit shaped like a pear, with green skin and white flesh, that is usually cooked and eaten as a vegetable. I love mixing it with tinola, sometimes with chop suey  or pancit.

What a great surprise when I saw these green shoots. It is a sun-loving perennial and all parts of it are edible from the roots to the tender tips of the vine. I hope this would grow well and bear fruits so I won’t have to buy some in the market.

 

In a few days, we would harvest our langka (jackfruit). It is getting so big now. There are more fruits growing at the base of the tree. Hopefully, we could cook them as veggies.

 

 

Read Full Post »


For gardeners out there, have you tried this? I have this old post which I wrote in May 11, 2009 and posted it at my blog Gardens and Empty Spaces. Back then “like” was not yet introduced by WordPress I think but you can comment on the post. This has earned a lot of comments.  Someone commented just yesterday. I am reposting it here.

In our trip to Zambales  a few days ago, I learned some interesting facts about growing things in one’s backyard, very common of which is the papaya plant. Papaya is a soft-wooded perennial plant that has an average lifespan of 5 years and would grow about 4 meters high. The flowering stage is from five to eight months after planting and harvesting comes around five to six months after that.

My sister-in-law is a certified farmer, she underwent a complete 6-months seminar given by the Dept. of Agriculture.  She shared with us what she learned and gave us some seeds of different vegetables which are quite easy to grow, given a small space ,even just in pots.

I was not even aware that you would be able to know whether that papaya tree in your own backyard will bear fruit or not. Most of us just wait for papaya to produce flowers before we will be able to detect whether it is a male or a female.  Papaya flowers are just like jasmine blossoms. The flowers of female papayas are close to the stems while that of the male ones produce long flowers. But we really don’t have to wait for six months before we’ll be able to know if they are worth cultivating or not.  That’s a waste of time and space, according to my sister-in-law. We know for a fact that only female papayas produce those sweet and delicious fruits. One sure way of knowing is this, papaya male plants have one straight root while those of the females are branched-out, producing two or more roots, they’re the only ones that you have to transfer and plant.  Interesting!

Tomatoes are capable of self-pollination so they grow fruits on their own. Same goes true with squash. We have planted some squash  and tomatoes in our small backyard and  they’re growing  by leaps and bounds everyday.  We also planted pechay (Pak Choi) in small pots. Eggplant seedlings are sprouting like crazy. I can’t wait, I am quite excited waiting for everything to grow.

I tried planting chayote two days ago at the back garden. We have a permanent trellis there where it could climb on. It is also known as mirliton squash,  an edible plant belonging to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae.  When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash; it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crispy consistency. Let us see how it grows in the next few days.

Our back garden and that’s Noki looking at some of our cats.

Planted some sweet potato vines a couple of months ago. We use the young leaves (found at the tip of each branch) to mix with our sinigang.

 

Read Full Post »


5:30 am

I was sitting at the garden waiting for the day to begin. The street lights were still on and it was dark still. With a mug of Swiss Miss in hand, I was also listening to the classical music on my transistor radio before the station signs in. It was one of those no-commercial break stations featuring those lovely music and passages from the Bible with corresponding reflections….lovely.

The morning is waking up. Cars and motorcycles break the silence. I got my garden shears and started  trimming the carabao grass. It has grown again in the whole month that we didn’t touch them. I stayed at the garden close to two hours and I didn’t even make a dent except trimming those so close to the concrete stepping stones.

That cleaner portion was the only thing I’ve done this morning.

I still have to trim the carabao grass here at the front of the house.

Only a grass cutter is practical here because we have lots of stepping stones  all the way from the garage up to the side of the house. I hope this afternoon won’t be too hot so I could garden again.

This is where my hanging plants are at the side of the house.

It’s a little tiring to stay in the garden when the sun is up.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »