Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘guilty pleasures’


I gardened for a while this morning replanting my rain lilies, some succulents and trimmed the Fukien tea plants. It is a lovely weather to garden now. The sun is shining and yet there is a cold morning breeze blowing. Perfect 🙂

Two weeks ago, we had a left-over piece of Chayote inside the ref. It is a tropical fruit shaped like a pear, with green skin and white flesh, that is usually cooked and eaten as a vegetable. I love mixing it with tinola, sometimes with chop suey  or pancit.

What a great surprise when I saw these green shoots. It is a sun-loving perennial and all parts of it are edible from the roots to the tender tips of the vine. I hope this would grow well and bear fruits so I won’t have to buy some in the market.

 

In a few days, we would harvest our langka (jackfruit). It is getting so big now. There are more fruits growing at the base of the tree. Hopefully, we could cook them as veggies.

 

 

Read Full Post »


Happy Sunday people and friends!

My gosh, I already reached 76% of my allowed free space for this blog. 24% more to go. I wonder how long will that be. Considering I have limited posting photos here and avoided posting them in high resolution unlike before, maybe it might take a while. I have another blog entitled Dreams Never End which you might like to visit too. The last time I updated it though was December 2019.

Yesterday was another lovely family day for us. Nissa’s family was here. Our good friend Fr. Aly spent lunch with us. We had a good chat about those earlier days. He has been our friend since our house was blessed in October 1995. He was only about two years into the priesthood then. He also officiated Nissa’s wedding more than eight years ago. It is really nice to bond with old friends, it’s like there is no gap in between.

I laughed at Nate for sneaking out some of his toys here. He was so proud when they were about to go and he was holding them in his hands. I told him, he has so few toys here compared to what he has accumulated at home. He wouldn’t leave them behind. He brought a Captain Marvel notebook and some colored pens which Nissa gave him. He divided the pages into Things Done, Drawings. Good, Bad etc. I laughed at his entries under Good. He watered the plants, he swept the floor ( he spelled the floor with just a single 0), he was behaved and he read books. On the Bad space he wrote: Daddy got mad at me because I was noisy. Under Drawings, he has several. He even drew a tree complete with roots and fruits showing 🙂 I taught him to draw a box and he imitated it and told me there was something inside it. Nate could be creative and expressive. I asked him what was inside, he told me he kept his toys there….clever idea! He is quite tall for his age and we have now the same size of footwear, haha.

Come to think of it,this is the only picture I took yesterday. We were more focused on sharing laughter and creating memories.

I hope you are having a wonderful weekend!

Read Full Post »


It rained yesterday until last night. It’s the first rain we experienced this year. It is still cloudy outside and a bit cold. It’s that kind of drizzle that makes streets slippery. We have to bring two umbrellas in going to the  wet market for our twice-a-month marketing. Surprisingly, vegetables from upland Baguio are cheaper than some veggies that come from nearby provinces here. Carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, French beans and lettuce are so fresh.  I bought a head of broccoli, gonna mix it with penne pasta, bits of ham and cream of mushroom as sauce.  Try it, it is pretty yummy 🙂

Remember this? It’s the one I made from our left-over Christmas ham more than a year ago.

One thing good about February is the cold weather  here.  We call it hanging amihan ( Northeast monsoon or trade winds). No storms, no low pressure area, just cold weather usually at night and early in the morning. The perfect time to stay in bed a little late.  And sipping a hot cup of coffee or tea makes the morning perfect too. Add that to our famous pandesal. Pandesal is the quintessential bread roll of the Philippines. You can use any kind of spread – peanut butter, cheese, sauteed corned beef, scrambled eggs, margarine, liver spread or even sardines.  Am I making you hungry? 

Josef and I dropped by Jollibee before going home from the market. We had the usual breakfast meals, half cup of fried rice, hotdog, poached egg and hot  choco for him while I ordered my favorite  longganisa  with poached egg and a steaming cup of coffee.  We brought home some breakfast too for Mom and Jovy.

Longganisa breakfast meal at Jollibee.

I love Saturdays. I love weekends. Next Saturday Nissa’s family and our good friend Fr. Aly are coming over for lunch. Looking forward to seeing them again. Thinking of what to cook. I already bought something for adobo, laing and pancit canton. Nissa usually brings roasted chicken or pork barbeque. Gonna buy more veggies on Friday for vegetable salad.

Don’t you just love weekends?

Read Full Post »


Have you ever read a book based on its title and book cover?

I did. I do.

Lately, I started my 2020 Goodreads Reading Challenge. I have read 15 books so far, an eclectic mix of memoirs, fairy tales, children’s books, fiction and historical books. I just thought it would be a good change to see book titles and book covers, how they were presented, not necessarily authors.  I always read same authors anyway when I find some of their books interesting. Historical books to me always come in first because I love history no matte if the setting was just incorporated in the book itself. There is something wonderful knowing about the early years of man’s existence, how people were able to cope with lesser amenities that we have now. Period stories are fascinating to me.

Of course  it is always a thrill to discover new authors, some recommended by fellow book lovers and some I find online. It is always nice to see a place described in another perspective.  I recently saw Stephen King’s the Green Mile but I am not ready yet to read another Stephen King.  It was years ago when I discovered some of his earlier works and I liked The Shining best. That was followed by my fascination with Robert Ludlum and Richard North Patterson. I had so many Ludlum books before but I lost some of it back in 2009 during a typhoon that flooded our place. Leon Uris came next, history at its best.  I also love the works of Frank McCourt. ‘Tis and Angela’s Ashes are the best.  I also read The Teacher Man. I haven’t discovered yet if he has new books in the market.

Occasionally, I read love stories too. I enjoyed A Hundred Little Flames.  A unique story, an engrossing read.  I am presently reading Dance Upon The Air by Nora Roberts. It has some good reviews on Goodreads. Sometimes though I am challenged by reading some unknown authors and not so good book reviews.

What have you been reading lately? Can you recommend authors that you like?

Read Full Post »


Yeay, seems like my reading has taken a back seat.  Though I still enjoy it, I am now more focused on the latest news and sometimes watch senseless (at least to me) hearings  of the the Dept. of Health. This is another good for nothing secretary out there who used to say in the first few days of when news broke out about the coronavirus that it was not yet time to concern ourselves about it.  This time it seems that they can’t explain to the public how they would deal with this virus. Come to think of it, we don’t even have testing kits. Pathetic!  And duterte surfaced yesterday after a five-day absence, surfaces as a medical expert and seer saying it will die a natural death. Then we learned about the fatality and he said “there is a shortage of face masks because there is a virus outbreak. if there is no virus outbreak,  there would be no shortage of face masks”. Few kind words from a “supposed” head of the nation (sarcasm there).They keep defending their good friend china to the detriment of our own countrymen. They are still playing politics.

I reread another children’s book last night for the nth time in between my regular reads. The magic is still there after all these years. Charlotte’s Web and The Velveteen Rabbit  belong to my favorite books. A few weeks ago. I got hold of Shel Silverstein’s The Giving Tree, it is a very short story written with illustrations about a little boy and an apple tree. I love it too.

I am presently reading A Hundred Little Flames. The author, Preeti Shenoy is Indian, her work has been translated to many languages. There are several Indian bloggers here that I follow and one of them always features the beauty of Kerala which is one of the places described in the book. It is nice to  learn another culture through books and blogs.  A lovely way to know something beyond the border…..beautiful.

 

 

Read Full Post »


I found another lovely book by Peter Mayle. This is my fourth book of him after  reading his first three books. I have made short reviews here before. This is actually my 12th  read this year.

French Lessons: Adventures with Knife, Fork, and Corkscrew

It’s another memoir about his life in France. He died two years ago and I blogged about it here. I am excited to start this.

I just finished a long fiction called New York. It is a historical novel by British novelist Edward Rutherfurd. Oh my, it’s all of 862 pages, four centuries of life in New York. It used to be called New Amsterdam. The novel chronicles the birth and growth of New York City, from the arrival of the first Dutch and other European colonists in the 17th century to the summer of 2009. Come to think of it, I didn’t even know that it was previously ruled by the British empire. Originally there were only 13 colonies in the whole US of A. It’s actually too long to summarize.

Read Full Post »


For gardeners out there, have you tried this? I have this old post which I wrote in May 11, 2009 and posted it at my blog Gardens and Empty Spaces. Back then “like” was not yet introduced by WordPress I think but you can comment on the post. This has earned a lot of comments.  Someone commented just yesterday. I am reposting it here.

In our trip to Zambales  a few days ago, I learned some interesting facts about growing things in one’s backyard, very common of which is the papaya plant. Papaya is a soft-wooded perennial plant that has an average lifespan of 5 years and would grow about 4 meters high. The flowering stage is from five to eight months after planting and harvesting comes around five to six months after that.

My sister-in-law is a certified farmer, she underwent a complete 6-months seminar given by the Dept. of Agriculture.  She shared with us what she learned and gave us some seeds of different vegetables which are quite easy to grow, given a small space ,even just in pots.

I was not even aware that you would be able to know whether that papaya tree in your own backyard will bear fruit or not. Most of us just wait for papaya to produce flowers before we will be able to detect whether it is a male or a female.  Papaya flowers are just like jasmine blossoms. The flowers of female papayas are close to the stems while that of the male ones produce long flowers. But we really don’t have to wait for six months before we’ll be able to know if they are worth cultivating or not.  That’s a waste of time and space, according to my sister-in-law. We know for a fact that only female papayas produce those sweet and delicious fruits. One sure way of knowing is this, papaya male plants have one straight root while those of the females are branched-out, producing two or more roots, they’re the only ones that you have to transfer and plant.  Interesting!

Tomatoes are capable of self-pollination so they grow fruits on their own. Same goes true with squash. We have planted some squash  and tomatoes in our small backyard and  they’re growing  by leaps and bounds everyday.  We also planted pechay (Pak Choi) in small pots. Eggplant seedlings are sprouting like crazy. I can’t wait, I am quite excited waiting for everything to grow.

I tried planting chayote two days ago at the back garden. We have a permanent trellis there where it could climb on. It is also known as mirliton squash,  an edible plant belonging to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae.  When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash; it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crispy consistency. Let us see how it grows in the next few days.

Our back garden and that’s Noki looking at some of our cats.

Planted some sweet potato vines a couple of months ago. We use the young leaves (found at the tip of each branch) to mix with our sinigang.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »