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Posts Tagged ‘reading’


Been going back and forth to the doctor the past few days, that is  every Saturday.  He suggested that I undergo Urine Culture and Sensitivity Test. I have to buy a bottle of distilled water  so I could submit the required amount of urine for the laboratory. I mentioned earlier that I am also a  colon cancer survivor and he also included CEA marker testing in his request. I am nervous and at the same time confident that my CEA markers would be normal. Praying on it and for it.

A few more hours to go and  it’ll be another leaf in the calendar. Uneventful June if I may  say. I don’t know, lately I feel so lazy to go out and socialize. A friend invited me to a party this coming week but it is a night affair. I don’t go out at night (really) because of the hardship in commuting. Besides,  I don’t want Oreo to be left alone in the house for long. I usually leave him for a few minutes when I buy some lacking grocery items  in our pantry. The village grocery store is just outside our village’s gate, a five-minute walk from our place.

Some people might think the days are boring. I am busy most of the time to get bored and when I am not doing anything, I read. You are not alone when you read. Books are unique in the sense that they get you to places you have never been to, experience those heart-stopping moments of a chase, learn more crafts, increase your  awareness on the lives of people you only meet in  books. It’s one thing why I love reading memoirs too. I always remember Stephen King’s words when I read. He said and I quote “Books are uniquely portable magic”. I was lucky enough to find his lovely book called “On Writing:  A Memoir of the Craft” several years ago. I have read it thrice already. I thought at first it was an autobiography but it was all about some pointers in writing.  I say, write from the heart.

Hello July. Surprise me please.

 

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The golden sun showed its face early and the rays made the  green leaves of the plants shiny and bright. Sun-lit grass, they’re like pearls scattered all around.  It rained a little last night, another day of saving precious water to maintain them.

I spent an hour at the garden before the sun was up, pruning, weeding and sweeping unwanted fallen leaves on the ground. I need not tell you how peaceful and quiet the early morning was. A really perfect time to commune with Nature.

Just done with my 79th read yesterday, 31 books ahead of schedule on my  Goodreads’ Reading Challenge. Through Rushing Water by Catherine Richmond  is a historical novel set in 1876 at the Ponca Indian Agency in Dakota Territory. It is a story of a tribe struggling with daily lives, trying to make do with the meager means they have and a missionary who taught the Indian kids  in such  a primitive place. It was inspired by true events  experienced by the Ponca Indians. This is the first time I encountered a story about the lives of Indians in early America and it was a riveting  and inspiring read.

When you find a good book that makes you learn events of the past, you’ll try to look for another book like it. Presently though, I’ve started on a thriller called Look  For Me, it’s my first read of Lisa Gardner.  I hope it does not disappoint.

Time flies, the June month is almost over. Happy Thursday everyone. Be someone’s sunshine today. May we all be blessed.

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Will this never ends? I found twenty comments on my spam folder with the usual sites before with the word sexy at the middle of the e-addy.  I am guessing this is only one person using different e-mails.  I don’t know what they get  out of such useless spam  comments. Waste of time really. I even noticed that my comments on two blog posts by friends  were  “liked” by a spammer with  the same e-mail address. What do you think?

Equinoxio21, an online friend advised me to bring back the re-blog button by going to “sharing” on “My Site”  menu   and clicking the “Sharing buttons”  and saving it. Voila, the re-blog button appears again. Thank you!

I found another book by one of my favorite authors (aside of course from Mary Oliver, Richard Paul Evans, Khaled Hosseini and many others) Nadia Hashimi.  Hashimi is an American doctor, a bestselling novelist and a women’s rights advocate.  Her parents are Afghans so she always write about life in Afghanistan.  Since I encountered Khaled’s Hosseini’s books years ago, I looked for other Asian authors and found her.  I’ve read three of her books before two of which I posted reviews here two years ago. When The Moon Is Low is Goodreads’ Best Book of 2015, I actually wrote short reviews about her first three books that I read. Here’s my take on this: One of the best books I read so far on the 2016 reading challenge. I wonder why I am always drawn to historical novels (I am an old soul) and stories about Afghanistan always make me cry.

The Pearl  That Broke Its Shell came second on my reading list although it was her literary debut novel. And I wrote: “A painful but riveting story about what life is like for women in Afghanistan.”The Pearl the Broke Its Shell interweaves the tales of these two women separated by a century who share similar destinies.” Here’s a lovely quote from that book.

“Life has typhoons. They come and turn everything upside down. But you still have to stand up because the next storm may be around the corner”.

The third book is entitled One Half From The East.  I am reading the fourth book now. Just like the first three books, this one looks so good. A House Without Windows is a haunting story about friendship and the plight of women in Afghanistan.

If only I could find her other book which I think is the newest so far.  When you find such gifted authors, you always look forward to what they write about.

Yes, I remember another author, Khaled Hosseini, Afghan born and also a doctor. His memorable book, The Kite Runner was adapted into film which Nissa and I watched years ago. We cried inside the cinema.

 

 

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I just thought this is a lovely way to greet you today. The picture is not mine though, it was just sent by a friend.

Happy weekend too. Friday is still overcast. And I don’t have to water the plants. Yehey!  I harvested my first eggplant this morning and there are more showing their tiny faces to the world. I hope I would enjoy harvesting  just like with my bottle gourds. They are still fruiting until now. I am waiting for my jackfruits to ripen.

Done with another lovely book by Kristin Hannah. I started reading The Tattooist of Auschwitz last night, a book by Heather Morris, based on a true story of two Slovakian Jews who survived Auschwitz.

I wonder why I am always drawn to historical books, fiction or otherwise particularly in that time of history which is the Second World War.  I love those heart-wrenching stories of survival, the hope and faith of each person to live a normal life again.

Have a lovely and blessed weekend everyone!

If you wake up in the morning, it is a good day”. – Heather Morris

 

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I woke seeing my dashboard full of spam mails. It looks like it came from just one person with different e-mails because the message for all is just this word: “What?” I wonder why they never get tired of spamming legit posts.

Finally, I’m done fixing the garden but I haven’t trimmed the carabao grass yet. The sun is still hot even at 4 pm. The Zinnia and Calendula seeds I planted last week have finally sprouted. Looking forward to transferring them later. The fulfillment of having the  garden looking like one finally…priceless.

I am trying to catch  up on my reading but at around 8 pm,  I feel so sleepy. I only get to read  a few pages. Still, there are twenty books I’ve read in advance according to Goodreads. I wake up early every morning though. The day is a little longer now than night-time. Six in the morning is already bright outside. Watering the plants  early is better than waiting for the sun to rise where the water easily evaporates because of the heat.

Also looking forward to blogging every day (if possible) again and reading posts from my blogging friends.

Happy Monday all!

 

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My shout out at my wall on Facebook:

Attended mass early this morning without eye glasses. It’s been more than three decades since I started wearing one. Nakakapanibago. My eyes felt so naked….haha!

My eye operation was a minor one compared to those earlier two I had before but the the tremendous  result  is truly amazing.  The longer we are faced with these treatments, the more modern they become and it also becomes easier for the patient to adjust. When I had my first major operation in the late nineties because of my endemetriosis, my surgeon used stitches on the outer wound but when I underwent sigmoid surgery back in 2009, the surgical oncologist used  staple  type sutures and they were easier to remove but permanent, non-absorbable sutures are sometimes preferred because they are resistant to body chemicals that might otherwise dissolve them too early in the healing process. Non-absorbable sutures are useful for maintaining long-term tissue wound closure and healing.

With an eye operation, you rely on the durability of the lenses that they use. “Modern intraocular lenses are made from highly durable materials. These materials are inert, and their chemical or physical composition will not change with the passage of the years”. Since it is quite common that you feel a little itch every time you use an eye drop, there is a tendency to rub it unconsciously. Maybe that is why they give you plastic lenses right after the operation to protect them.  I used mine for two days then I was prescribed reading glasses.  So far, so good.

Maybe in a few months, I will have my  right eye be operated too or maybe in about a year. The lenses are not included in the insurance so you really have to shell out cash for it. I told my doctor I still have to save for my next one 🙂

If you are thinking of having your eyes done for this procedure, don’t worry, it is quite safe.

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Good morning everyone! Can’t believe April is almost over. Today is April 24th.

The last time I wrote a post here was three days ago. I deliberately didn’t write one because I was trying to finish a lovely and interesting memoir on Rome by no less than the gifted author of All The Light You Cannot See which I read three years ago.  I’ve been looking for  another book of Anthony Doerr since All The Light We Cannot See, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, a New York Times Book Review Top Ten Book, National Book Award finalist, more than two and a half years on the New York Times bestseller list. It was Goodreads’ choice winner for 2014.

Two days ago, I found one. Four Seasons in Rome is a lovely narrative on how he and his family spent a year in Rome, He knew nothing about the Italian way of life,  just simple words by way of greeting.  They were there when his twins turned one and then wrote  something about the crowd  at St. Peter’s  Square  when  St. Pope John Paul II died last April 02, 2005.  He was there when a new pope,  Pope Benedict was chosen to succeed JP II.

I love the way he described every place  they have been too, the smell of pizza and cheese, the daily grind in the city.  And for each season, more adjustments too. I am reminded of another memoir  by another  author Peter Mayle who recently died. He wrote about Provence and its food and the daily life there. Anthony Doerr wrote about being a parent of twins,  the sleepless nights he suffered, the encounter with so many people who didn’t speak English.

I wish I could find more of his books in the future.

 

 

 

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