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Posts Tagged ‘literature and Fiction’


Blogging about books again.

Hooray! I found another lovely book by a Nigerian author, a first on my list.

Chimimanda Ngozi Adichie is a Nigerian author. Purple Hibiscus is her first novel which was published  in October 2003. I am still in the middle of reading it but it is just so engrossing.  This is the first time I encountered a Nigerian author.  I’ve read some famous Asian authors before the likes of Chinese-American Amy Tan, Afghan born Khaled Hosseini, our very own Miguel Syjuco, Afghan-American Nadia Hashimi, Japanese writer Haruki Murakami,  African-American writer  Zora Neale Hurston to name a few. There are less known Asian authors that I encountered before, this one though is new on my list 

Purple Hibiscus is set in postcolonial Nigeria, a country beset by economic difficulties and political unrest.  Learning about their culture, how the rich differ in a wide-angle from an average family, the concept of freedom,  coming of age, a rigidly Catholic upbringing – all the ingredients of a good novel.

Oh my gosh, the more I read, the more I am finding wonderful authors  such as Adichie. I hope I could find more of her works one of these days.  I am setting aside some of my TBR list just to read this first.

 

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Call me a book addict or a bookworm  or the more high-sounding word bibliophile but I just love books.  Take that to mean a new book with the dust jacket still on, a second-hand find from a Booksale store, an e-book   on my tab or just about anything that spells b-o-o-k. 

I’ve just finished my 18th book this year  (according to Goodreads where I have a virtual library) last night.  And it is a story about books and maintaining a bookshop. I had a good laugh reading it and enjoyed all the lovely and inspirational  book quotes written there.

My tab with Nate’s photo as a screen saver.

Sometimes I forget to jot them down but I go back and write them in my new journal.  It is always nice to read words that take you to another place, another time  and experiences.  My reading  genre is an eclectic mix of cook books, memoirs, poems, historical novels, classic books and fiction.  Sometimes I feel as if I am the main character in the story.  When you experience the triumphs, the fears, the disappointments and the  happy moments, it means that you are into the story.

I am into my fourth journal of quotes from most of the books I’ve read in the past. I feel energized reading these inspiring and motivational words from different authors.

Don’t you just love the smell of new books or the  excitement of finding something on your wish list?   Don’t you just love that pile of TBRs on your night table?

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Oh my, can’t believe this. I just finished my 14th book this 2018.  And I promised myself to finish a hundred books. Goodreads says I am 8 books ahead of schedule. Hooray!

The One Man by Andrew Gross.

It’s actually my first time to read an Andrew Gross book.   Back to the Holocaust and concentration camps.  Nazi persecution,  Auschwitz, gas chambers, murder of millions of Jews. It was a riveting read. Familiar story about WWII.  It is the first book I read this year with a five star.  That’s how much I enjoyed this book. Here’s a short summary  from Goodreads:

It’s 1944. Physics professor Alfred Mendel and his family are trying to flee Paris when they are caught and forced onto a train along with thousands of other Jewish families. At the other end of the long, torturous train ride, Alfred is separated from his family and sent to the men’s camp, where all of his belongings are tossed on a roaring fire. His books, his papers, his life’s work. The Nazis have no idea what they have just destroyed. And without that physical record, Alfred is one of only two people in the world with his particular knowledge. Knowledge that could start a war–or end it.

Nathan Blum works behind a desk at an intelligence office in Washington, DC, but he longs to contribute to the war effort in a more meaningful way, and he has a particular skill set the US suddenly needs. Nathan is fluent in German and Polish, and he proved his scrappiness at a young age when he escaped from the Krakow ghetto. Now the government wants him to take on the most dangerous assignment of his life: Nathan must sneak into Auschwitz on a mission to find and escape with one man.

More than 20 years ago, I discovered another writer and I read most of his books.  Leon Uris. Uris is American but his parents were Jewish  American. He writes  historical novels too, mostly about WWII and Poland.  Mila 18, QB VII and Trinity are my favorites.

Reading another Peter Mayle book at the moment.  Encore Provence, my third book of Peter Mayle.

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I can’t really believe he is gone  Peter Mayle, an author I discovered early  last year. He  was one of those authors that you would likely read again after reading one of his books.  I did.

I first read A Year In Provence, then the sequel Toujours  Provence  followed. Got this photo from his page at Facebook.

I wrote this very short review  (at Goodreads) when I finished reading A Year In Provence.  It is  a warm-hearted account of what Provencal life was like. I  actually rated it five-stars.

“Then you wish you had that glass of wine to go while reading this book. I am reminded of another book about country life in Italy with the book Under The Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes. People say that Provence is France’s Tuscany while Tuscany is Italy’s Provence.” 

Rest in peace.

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I think I need this for now…..

The Journey
 
One day you finally knew
what you had to do, and began,
though the voices around you
kept shouting
their bad advice–
though the whole house
began to tremble
and you felt the old tug
at your ankles.
“Mend my life!”
each voice cried.
But you didn’t stop.
You knew what you had to do,
though the wind pried
with its stiff fingers
at the very foundations,
though their melancholy
was terrible.
It was already late
enough, and a wild night,
and the road full of fallen
branches and stones.
But little by little,
as you left their voices behind,
the stars began to burn
through the sheets of clouds,
and there was a new voice
which you slowly
recognized as your own,
that kept you company
as you strode deeper and deeper
into the world,
determined to do
the only thing you could do–
determined to save
the only life you could save.
   – Mary Oliver
Mary Oliver is one of my favorite poets. I have two of her books. From time to time I visit her site to be updated.

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Just done reading a book by David Baldacci. It’s been on my TBR list for almost two months before I picked it up again. I was distracted by other books and new authors.

This is quite different  from the usual genre that Baldacci writes about. If you are used to the thrillers that he churns out,  One Summer is a story of a family struggling with being together after the mother dies in a car accident.  The pain of losing a wife, the adjustments one has to make  having the kids around, the daily battle with longing and missing a much-loved family member.  This is not as touching as the stories woven by Nicholas Sparks or Richard Paul Evans. It is a light read though.

This is my fifth read and Goodreads says I am three books ahead of schedule. I am still on the look out for classics.  In the meantime, I’ll make do with historical fiction.

Are you on Goodreads? Did you join the challenge for this year?

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Started the year with a well-loved classic, Little Women by Louisa May  Alcott. Wow, 150 years into its first publication. I’ve seen several volumes of this  book when  I worked at the  UST library as a student librarian way back in the seventies but I was never inclined to read it. There were so many choices then.

I am hoping I would enjoy reading it as much as those who have rated it five stars on Goodreads.  I am not really influenced by five-star rating, I’d rather explore it on my own but sometimes it helps one decide what to read next.  I have discovered so many talented and gifted  contemporary authors through this medium.  Maybe one of these days, I would re-read more of the Brontë sisters,  Charlotte’s Jane Eyre and Emily’s Wuthering Heights.  I have two books of the latter and an old copy of the former.

 

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