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Archive for the ‘reading’ Category


I just updated our Catholic page at Facebook when I came home from the 6:30 am mass in our Parish. I was thrilled to see these readings right on Nissa’s birthday come September 28. First reading is Ecclesiastes 3: 1-11.

1For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven:2a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted;3a time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;4a time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;5a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;6a time to seek, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;7a time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;8a time to love, and a time to hate; a time for war, and a time for peace.9What gain has the worker from his toil?10I have seen the business that God has given to the sons of men to be busy with.11He has made everything beautiful in its time; also he has put eternity into man’s mind, yet so that he cannot find out what God has done from the beginning to the end.

I always love the Ecclesiastes readings. It tells us about how life is, how we go on with it and how we should face all those adversities and challenges that go our way. Life is not perfect, we all know that but there is always time for everything. There is always time to enjoy life, time to laugh and time to cry.

Last night, I finished the last page of the book Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise  Gornall, a first-timer on my list of books.

One thing that first attracted me to it is not the summary but the photo cover. I haven’t read a YA book for so many months now, then came this. I love it.

Can you imagine yourself being afraid of public places and so particular about cleanliness and hygiene that your life is not  normal?

The book focuses on anxiety disorder, OCD and agoraphobia. They are mental health issues that none of us know about. Self inflicted wounds find its place in a teenager’s life. How could one empathize with a sickness that  you can’t see?

This is the first time I’ve read about agoraphobia.  I remember  a daughter of our neighbor who is bipolar. She has been in and out of the hospital some years ago. There were times when we just hear loud shouts from her. When she is in a good mood, you can talk to her about anything under the sun.

This book is not for everyone . I was curious what goes in someone’s mind if he or she has anxiety disorder. How does the family cope  with it? How do you deal with someone with OCD?

 

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It’s a sunny Wednesday morning here. Perfect time to spend a few moments in the garden. Yes, just harvested about half a kilo of calamansi (Philippine lime) and gave some to our neighbor.

I saw this lovely meme from one of my friend’s walls at Facebook early this morning. I smiled and thought of sharing it here.

Reading, my favorite activity since I was in high school. Back in my grade school days, we didn’t have a public library in the province and reading materials were  so few and far between. I became a voracious reader when I worked for almost three years during college at my university library as a student librarian.

If those studies are true, maybe I am in the right path. Of course I love listening to music but always, reading takes precedent.  I am on a leisurely read nowadays after finishing the 2018 Reading Challenge at Goodreads finishing 100 books. I am still trying to find good books. I no longer read self-help books, I’ve done that several years ago. I  now prefer historical fiction, sometimes contemporary and YA books too and occasionally some memoirs in between.  Lately I discovered a gifted British author of thrillers and suspense and finished reading two of his books. Presently, I am reading another book by Susan Mallery, an American author who is into romance , fiction and chick lit.  I love stories of families and their own struggles in life, the way they deal with adversities and how they triumph over them.  Though I am not much into romance books (sometimes they are so predictable), When We found Home seems to be a good one, a story of three half-siblings, mothered by three different women with a common father.

Does reading really reduces stress? I believe so.  Where can you find a place you’ve never been to but is so vivid in your mind? Where can you find characters that somehow you could relate to?  Have you traveled the world while reading books?

What are you reading now?

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I’m done reading a hundred books in more than seven  months. I love this challenge  because I discovered so many authors and lovely books in the process.

I remember accepting the challenge back in 2011 and every year I committed to read at least a hundred books minimum but I always end up reading close to two hundred at times.  This year I started with a classic  Little Women  by Louisa May  Alcott and ended with a thriller called City of Endless Night by Preston & Child. It’s time to take a break and just enjoy reading at a leisurely pace.

I remember these lines while I was reading Catcher In the Rye a long time ago and even wrote them in my journal.

“What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though.”  J.D. Salinger

But then it is enough that yesterday an author acknowledged my review on her book.  Nice, isn’t it?

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Maybe “notorious” is not really the right word, more like a voracious reader. Insatiable, greedy, always excited about new books.  As I have always said, I love the smell and texture of new books. The anticipation is there and so is the excitement  to read. I always put plastic covers on my books and I usually use book marks since I don’t want the pages folded. I neatly arrange them in the shelves by authors and title of the books but my best books are usually placed in the highest shelf. Weird isn’t it?

Life of a bookworm, always holding a book in hand or enlarging the prints of the e-books and changing the background.

I normally read at night or before I take a thirty-minute siesta at noon. Most of the time, my books are left  on my chest and go to sleep still wearing  my reading glass. Oreo loves to play with the latter when he sometimes jumps atop the bed and see it. I caught him this afternoon with his mouth on the frame. Naughty, naughty Oreo.

I am trying to find more classic books that I haven’t read yet. Would you believe, I started reading Anna Karenina last year I think but I only finished half of it. It’s too long and my eyes couldn’t take  the small prints. I already read about a third of Goodreads’ list of 100 books you have to read before you die.  Yes, they have those books too and they based their survey on readers’ choices. I have a copy of Dracula by  Bram Stoker. It’s been in our shelf  for so many years now but I haven’t attempted reading it. And it is included in those 100 list of books. I used to have a complete list of the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon but some of them were destroyed by the flood.  Hopefully, when I am done with the challenge I’ll be able to find extra copies of those books.

I still have so many books on my wish list:

  1. Witness to Hope by George Weigel (A Biography of Saint Pope John Paul II)
  2. Anne Frank Beyond the Diary: A Photo Remembrance
  3. The Bell  Jar by Sylvia Plath
  4. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
  5. Happy All The Time by Laurie Colwin
  6. I Am David by  Anne Holm
  7. Caught In the Quiet by Rod McKuen
  8. With Love by Rod McKuen
  9. In The Dark Before Dawn by Thomas Merton
  10. The Honorary Consul by Graham Greene

Those are just ten, right? But there are many more.

Here’s a lovely quote I found on Brainy Quote.

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I am getting addicted with  Sydney Bauer’s books. I found three of hers, the first one which I blogged about a few days ago  was published much, much later than the one I have just finished and the third book I am reading at the moment. It seems to be a series but stand alone stories involving a criminal lawyer defending those who are accused of crimes they didn’t commit. The courtroom scenes and the way they gather evidences are so interesting. I have always loved “courtrooms” since I first encountered Lean Uris’ book called QBVII.  Conspiracy, racial bigotry, fast-paced  action scenes. Move over John Grisham, she’s it for now.

 Alibi  is my 94th read and I’m done with about a third of the book. Suspense thrillers, how lovely!

Yeay, six more books to go and I’m done. Plenty  months more to add those classics which I have yet to find.

 

 

 

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Just done with my 89th Goodreads book challenge for this year.  Here’s my short review on Goodreads.

I am giving this five stars. Wow, what a great read! A story of two kids who survived the Peshtigo fire in Wisconsin, the greatest fire in American history in 1871 and a six-year old orphan, a survivor from a Chicago fire on the same day. A story of struggles and triumphs, a story of ups and downs, a story of survival. 

Tess Hilmo is on my list of newly discovered authors. She writes a wonderful story, amazing children’s dialogue. The characters are fictional but the events were based on true stories. 

I am always drawn to historical fiction. I find them even more arresting to read than your run of the mill romances. I wish I could find more books like this.

Eleven more books to go and I’m done.  How lovely it is when you find a book this good.

 

 

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Good morning everyone! Can’t believe April is almost over. Today is April 24th.

The last time I wrote a post here was three days ago. I deliberately didn’t write one because I was trying to finish a lovely and interesting memoir on Rome by no less than the gifted author of All The Light You Cannot See which I read three years ago.  I’ve been looking for  another book of Anthony Doerr since All The Light We Cannot See, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, a New York Times Book Review Top Ten Book, National Book Award finalist, more than two and a half years on the New York Times bestseller list. It was Goodreads’ choice winner for 2014.

Two days ago, I found one. Four Seasons in Rome is a lovely narrative on how he and his family spent a year in Rome, He knew nothing about the Italian way of life,  just simple words by way of greeting.  They were there when his twins turned one and then wrote  something about the crowd  at St. Peter’s  Square  when  St. Pope John Paul II died last April 02, 2005.  He was there when a new pope,  Pope Benedict was chosen to succeed JP II.

I love the way he described every place  they have been too, the smell of pizza and cheese, the daily grind in the city.  And for each season, more adjustments too. I am reminded of another memoir  by another  author Peter Mayle who recently died. He wrote about Provence and its food and the daily life there. Anthony Doerr wrote about being a parent of twins,  the sleepless nights he suffered, the encounter with so many people who didn’t speak English.

I wish I could find more of his books in the future.

 

 

 

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